Two examples of great messages

Example 1: Albert Einstein Albert Einstein worked with three different collaborators to be able to describe his theories in clear terms with everyday examples. He understood that a theory only five geniuses could understand is far less valuable than one that can be understood by millions. For example: Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a More…

Finding poise: do you shrink under pressure?

In a previous article, I talked about a condition known as over-efforting, where we use far more energy than is required for a particular activity. This is quite common in public speaking, as people think they need to perform and exaggerate their voice, gestures and body language to have greater impact on the audience. And More…

FAQ: How do I answer questions briefly?

Q: “How can I answer questions more briefly at the end of my presentation? During the Q & A session of a major presentation I answered questions to death!” A: Sacrifice… …It’s human nature to try to demonstrate how much we know about a subject – to show we have a right to speak about More…

Don’t try too hard. Less effort, better speaking results

Over-efforting is an interesting principle. Many of us have been taught the ‘no pain, no gain’ philosophy but, in many situations, the more pressure we apply, the more resistance we experience. When sportspeople are tense, they wear their bodies out faster. Tennis champ Roger Federer is an example of using a minimum amount of effort More…

Public Speaking: how to stop racing through presentations

Q: “How do I stop racing through presentations? I always find myself rushing.  What’s the best way to pace myself?”   This is a common thing when public speaking. The question is WHY are you rushing through your presentations? Is it because you are nervous and want it to be over now? Is it because More…